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Tag Archive: Science Magazine

Astronomers measure the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein

This Science Magazine shows how a team of astronomers has succeeded in measuring the mass of an isolated star using a technique first suggested by Albert Einstein in 1936.  

Jupiter’s skies are peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms

Two research papers published in Science Magazine this week presents the latest data from Juno revealing a Jupiter peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms. Scientists have long known that Jupiter is a stormy place. But since NASA’s Juno probe reached the solar system’s largest planet last July, they’ve found it to be …

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Why whales grew to such monster sizes

A new study in Science Magazine explains the evolutionary forces behind the ocean’s behemoths. It offers an explanation of why some whales became the world’s biggest animals. “They found that the baleen whales’ growth spurt coincided with the beginning of the first ice ages. As glaciers expanded, spring and summer runoff poured nutrients into the …

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Science Magazine: Tiny bubbles help heal broken bones

Repairing big bones breaks has been a challenge. Now researchers have used gene therapy to improve bone grafts in pigs. The new research “has huge clinical significance,” says David Kulber, who directs the Center for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, and who was not part of the study. …

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Look Out: Robots Could Soon Teach Each Other New Tricks

Someday soon, robot assistants will be a part of our everyday lives—but only if we can teach them new tasks without programming. If you have to learn to code, you might as well make the sandwich yourself. Now, a new system makes teaching robots almost as easy as teaching a child. And conveniently—or alarmingly, if …

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Science Magazine: Hunting microbe wields a “gatling gun” harpoon

Biologists sometimes use the phrase “arms race” to describe an evolutionary tug-of-war, but it’s rarely this literal. Microbes called dinoflagellates (above) have developed intricate weapons—including a microscopic version of a Gatling gun—to harpoon their dinners, a new study shows. Single-celled organisms have intricate microscopic weapons evolved for capturing prey.  

Science Magazine: A spongy robot hand with a sense of touch

Our hands don’t just hold things– they need to sense pressure and texture in order to help us grip and manipulate. This robot hand can detect bumpy patterns and even feel things like softness–watch to learn how.  

Science Magazine: We Don’t Know: Pain

Pain has evolved to motivate us to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future. Perhaps the same is true for emotional pain? Even if it isn’t avoidable in the first place. Science magazine latest “We Don’t Know”, a series on things …

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Science Magazine: Even without ears, jumping spiders can hear you

You’d probably never notice a jumping spider across your living room, but it would surely notice you. The arachnids are known for their brilliant eyesight, and a new study shows they have even greater sensory prowess than we thought: Jumping spiders can hear sounds even though they don’t have ears—or even eardrums.  

Science Magazine: Zoom on the galactic centre

Astronomers have found a dozen very old variable stars deep in the maelstrom of stars at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The discovery may help researchers decide which of two theories best explains how a “galactic bulge”—the pileups of stars at the galaxy’s center—forms.  

Science Magazine: The world’s largest telescope is about to come online

In a stunning landscape of jagged limestone hills in southwestern China, engineers are putting the finishing touches on a grand astronomy facility: a half-kilometer-wide dish nestled in a natural depression that will gather radio signals from the cosmos. The world’s largest radio telescope will catalog pulsars; probe gravitational waves, dark matter, and fast radio bursts; …

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Science Magazine: Carbon-based paper that walks when hit with a laser

Carbon-based paper folds itself up, walks away. Advance could lead to artificial muscles for robots. Researchers around the globe have developed a variety of sheetlike polymers and gels capable of folding in response to changes in temperature, pH, or other stimuli. Now, a team in China reports today in Science Advances that it has designed …

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Science Magazine: Moving robotic limbs with the power of imagination

By tapping into the planning part of the brain, complicated imagined movement can be converted into real movement using a robotic arm.