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Tag: Roman Empire

A brief history of goths – Dan Adams

The Goths were a Germanic people who were referred to as “barbarians” by the Romans, famous for sacking the city of Rome in A.D. 410, but who were they, really? And what do fans of atmospheric post-punk music have in common with the ancient barbarians? Not much … so why are both known as “goths”? …

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Israel Antiquities Authority: Fascinating evidence of Romans breaking through Jerusalem’s Third Wall

Fascinating evidence of the battlefield and the breaching of the Third Wall that surrounded Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period was uncovered last winter in the Russian Compound in the city center. The finds were discovered in an archaeological excavation the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted in the location where the new campus …

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Yale University: The Roman Empire from Hobbes to Rostovtzeff | Professor John Matthews

The 5th annual Michael I Rostovtzeff lecture, followed by an all-day symposium, and incorporating a visit to the new Dura Europus Galleries at the YUAG. John Matthews, John M. Schiff Professor of Classics and History, came to Yale in 1996, having spent his earlier career at the University of Oxford, where he was University Professor …

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VOX: Ancient Romans had disgusting condiments. Here’s a recipe.

We recently wrote this article on how some ancient roman kids were trying to escape the destruction of Pompeii carrying quite a lot of fish sauce, called ‘garum’. Now VOX have put together this video clip describing the process of making this popular ancient sauce, ‘the roman ketchup’. Garum was an ancient Roman fish sauce …

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Cornell University: Shedding new light on the death of Julius Caesar

Barry Strauss, Cornell’s Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies and chair of the Department of History, talks about “The Death of Caesar: New Light on History’s Most Famous Assassination” in this July 22, 2015 lecture sponsored by the School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions. Strauss is the author of a highly praised new book on …

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University of Edinburgh: Andrew Erskine – Roman Power, Greek Reaction

Andrew Erskine, Professor of Ancient History, delivered his inaugural lecture entitled “Roman power, Greek reaction”. Abstract At the beginning of second century BC, Rome announced that it had brought freedom to the Greeks. By the end of the century the Greeks were effectively the subjects of Rome. This lecture explores the Greek reaction to these …

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Smithsonian Channel: How Roman Legions Dominated the Ancient World

Each member of the Roman legions was superbly disciplined and dangerously armed. They were also key players in Rome’s global dominance.  

Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 06/22 | Transformation of the Roman Empire

The Early Middle Ages, 284–1000 (HIST 210) The Roman Empire in the West collapsed as a political entity in the fifth century although the Eastern part survived the crisis.. Professor Freedman considers this transformation through three main questions: Why did the West fall apart — because of the external pressure of invasions or the internal …

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Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 04/22 | The Christian Roman Empire

The Early Middle Ages, 284–1000 (HIST 210) The emperor Constantine’s conversion to Christianity brought change to the Roman Empire as its population gradually abandoned the old religions in favor of Christianity. The reign of Julian the Apostate, a nephew of Constantine, saw the last serious attempt to restore civic polytheism as the official religion. The …

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Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 03/22 | Constantine and the Early Church

Professor Freedman examines how Christianity came to be the official religion of the Roman Empire. This process began seriously in 312, when the emperor Constantine converted after a divinely inspired victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge. Constantine’s conversion would have seemed foolish as a political strategy since Christianity represented a completely different system …

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Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 02/22 | The Crisis of the Third Century and the Diocletianic Reforms

Professor Freedman outlines the problems facing the Roman Empire in the third century. The Persian Sassanid dynasty in the East and various Germanic tribes in the West threatened the Empire as never before. Internally, the Empire struggled with the problem of succession, an economy wracked by inflation, and the decline of the local elite which …

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Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 01/22 | Rome’s Greatness and First Crises

Professor Freedman introduces the major themes of the course: the crisis of the Roman Empire, the rise of Christianity, the threats from barbarian invasions, and the continuity of the Byzantine Empire. At the beginning of the period covered in this course, the Roman Empire was centered politically, logistically, and culturally on the Mediterranean Sea. Remarkable …

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Brian Rose: Rome The Eternal City

From its founding more than 2,800 years ago, Rome has become known as an “eternal city” world-renowned for its architecture. Dr. C. Brian Rose, Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology explores the history of this astounding city: Classical Rome, one of history’s most powerful civilizations. Rome …

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Barry Cunliffe: Who Were the Celts?

Published on Feb 4, 2014 Shallit Lecture given at BYU on March 17, 2008. The Celts living in the middle of Europe were the fearsome opponents of the Greeks and Romans and in c. 390 B.C. they actually besieged Rome. The classical writers have much to say about their warlike activities but where did they …

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Garrett Fagan: How to Stage a Bloodbath: Gladiators at the Roman Arena

Published on Apr 15, 2014 In this lecture, Dr. Garrett Fagan, Professor of Ancient History, Penn State University, explores the theatrical aspects of Roman arena games—the stage sets, equipment of the fighters, and so forth—that created an artificial landscape in which the violence of the spectacle was staged. He also considers what these features tell …

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PBS: Roman Bath

Tour the crumbling public baths of Rome to learn intimate details of what life was really like for ancient Roman citizens, and in the process, discover the engineering feats that made these baths such an impressive achievement.  

Dr. Patrick Hunt: Great Battles – Hannibal’s Secret Weapon in the Second Punic War

Dr. Patrick Hunt, Stanford University, speaks. Hannibal, a Carthaginian commander who lived ca. 200 BCE, is considered one of the greatest military commanders in history. His use of the environment in his warfare against Rome in the Second Punic War—often called the Hannibalic War—set precedents in military history, utilizing nature and weather conditions as weapons …

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PBS: The Roman Empire in the First Century – Years of Eruption

The Roman Empire in the First Century: Episode 4. Years of Eruption. Rival generals fight for control in Rome; Mount Vesuvius erupts; Emperor Trajan expands the empire. Empires is a series of epic historical films which present the people and passions that have changed the world. Developed jointly by PBS and Devillier Donegan Enterprises (DDE), a Washington, …

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PBS: The Roman Empire in the First Century – Winds of Change

The Roman Empire in the First Century: Episode 3. Claudius rules; Britain battles Roman legions; in Judea, Paul tells of Jesus; Rome verges on disaster Despite Cladius lack of experience, he proved to be an able and efficient administrator. Also an ambitious builder, ordering construction of many new roads, aqueducts, and canals across the Empire. …

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PBS: The Roman Empire in the First Century – Years of Trial

The Roman Empire in the First Century: Episode 2. Caligula grips Rome in fear; Judea’s religious and political establishment finds Jesus a threat. Empires is a series of epic historical films which present the people and passions that have changed the world. Developed jointly by PBS and Devillier Donegan Enterprises (DDE), a Washington, DC based global television …

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