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Tag: Human Brain

Reactions: How Does Alcohol Get You Drunk?

Reactions’ latest episode explains the chemistry behind its effects – drunkenness, frequent bathroom breaks and occasionally poor decision-making.  

TED: The brain may be able to repair itself — with help | Jocelyne Bloch

Through treating everything from strokes to car accident traumas, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch knows the brain’s inability to repair itself all too well. But now, she suggests, she and her colleagues may have found the key to neural repair: Doublecortin-positive cells. Similar to stem cells, they are extremely adaptable and, when extracted from a brain, cultured …

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Nature Video: Neuroscience: Crammed with connections

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.  

Science Magazine: Moving robotic limbs with the power of imagination

By tapping into the planning part of the brain, complicated imagined movement can be converted into real movement using a robotic arm.  

Rice University: New tactic targets brain tumors

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research at Rice University.  

Miguel Nicolelis: Brain-to-brain communication has arrived. How we did it

You may remember neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis — he built the brain-controlled exoskeleton that allowed a paralyzed man to kick the first ball of the 2014 World Cup. What’s he working on now? Building ways for two minds (rats and monkeys, for now) to send messages brain to brain. Watch to the end for an experiment …

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MIT: Multifunctional fibers communicate with the brain

By producing complex multifunctional fibers that could be less than the width of a hair, MIT researchers have created a system that could deliver optical signals and drugs directly into the brain, along with a simultaneous electrical readout to continuously monitor the effects of the various inputs.  

TED-Ed: The benefits of a good night’s sleep

It’s 4am, and the big test is in 8 hours. You’ve been studying for days, but you still don’t feel ready. Should you drink another cup of coffee and spend the next few hours cramming? Or should you go to sleep? Shai Marcu defends the latter option, showing how sleep restructures your brain in a …

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MCB80x Neuroscience: Fundamentals of Neuroscience Presents: The Synapse

What’s a synapse? Look inside your clay brain with Harvard’s Neuroscience MOOC and find out!  

David Cox: Recreating the Brain

Computational neuroscientist David Cox reveals how vision works in the brain and explains how his research can help pave the way towards prosthetics that restore or enhance brain function, as well as enabling the design of computer algorithms that “see” like we do.  

Jeff Iliff: One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

The brain uses a quarter of the body’s entire energy supply, yet only accounts for about two percent of the body’s mass. So how does this unique organ receive and, perhaps more importantly, rid itself of vital nutrients? New research suggests it has to do with sleep.  

Nancy Kanwisher: A neural portrait of the human mind

Brain imaging pioneer Nancy Kanwisher, who uses fMRI scans to see activity in brain regions (often her own), shares what she and her colleagues have learned: The brain is made up of both highly specialized components and general-purpose “machinery.” Another surprise: There’s so much left to learn.  

Ohio State University: Man Moves Paralyzed Hand With His Own Thoughts

A man in Ohio has become the first patient ever to move his paralyzed hand by using his thoughts. In a small, crowded laboratory at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 23-year old Ian Burkhart looked closely at his hand, squinted with concentration and made a fist as doctors, neuroscientists and engineers from Battelle, …

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MIT: Neuron Activity in 3-D

Researchers at MIT and the University of Vienna have created an imaging system that reveals neural activity throughout the brains of living animals. This technique, the first that can generate 3-D movies of entire brains at the millisecond timescale, could help scientists discover how neuronal networks process sensory information and generate behavior. The team used …

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Michio Kaku on Reading Minds, Recording Dreams, and Brain Imaging

Dr. Michio Kaku returns to Big Think studios to discuss his latest book, The Future of the Mind. Here he explains the remarkable advances in brain imaging.  

The (Neuro) Science of Genius with Michio Kaku, Antonio Damasio, JoAnn Deak and Robert Krulwich

Published on Mar 11, 2014 Join us for on a mind-boggling exploration of the most fascinating and complex object in the known universe: the human brain. Discover radical new ways to think about consciousness, how the brain grows and changes, and how advances in technology are revealing far more about the inner workings of the mind …

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Mary Lou Jepsen: Could future devices read images from our brains?

FILMED MAR 2013 • POSTED MAR 2014 • TED2013 As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen studies how to show our most creative ideas on screens. And as a brain surgery patient herself, she is driven to know more about the neural activity that underlies invention, creativity, thought. She meshes these two …

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Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?

FILMED JUL 2013 • POSTED FEB 201 • TEDGlobal 2013 After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn’t happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease …

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Ted Ed: What percentage of your brain do you use?

Two thirds of the population believes a myth that has been propagated for over a century: that we use only 10% of our brains. Hardly! Our neuron-dense brains have evolved to use the least amount of energy while carrying the most information possible — a feat that requires the entire brain. Richard E. Cytowic debunks …

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Per Byhring: Picture of a thought

This video explains the two most common methods used to see neurons at work: EEG and functional magnetic resonance – fMRI. Picture of a thought from Per Byhring on Vimeo.

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