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Tag: Homo Neanderthalensis

Nature: The first Americans: Clues to an ancient migration

An archaeological site in California may have opened up a whole new chapter in the history of humans in the Americas. Researchers claim the site shows evidence of humans interacting with the bones of a mastodon, an ice age relative of elephants and mammoths. New dating suggests the site may be 130,000 years old – …

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University of California: Neandertal Denisovan Human Interbreeding

This symposium brings together researchers at the forefront of ancient DNA research and population genetics to discuss current developments and share insights about human migration and adaptation.  

University of California: CARTA: DNA–Neandertal and Denisovan Genomes; Neandertal Genes in Humans; Neandertal Interbreeding

This symposium brings together researchers at the forefront of ancient DNA research and population genetics to discuss current developments and share insights about human migration and adaptation.

Natural History Museum: Making a Neanderthal flint stone tool

Watch a flint knapper make a Levallois core and flake, an innovative stone tool developed by the Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens. Find out about human tool-making capabilities and five key features that make us human.  

Vanderbilt University: Neanderthal DNA has subtle but significant impact on human traits

Since 2010 scientists have known that people of Eurasian origin have inherited anywhere from 1 to 4 percent of their DNA from Neanderthals. The discovery spawned a number of hypotheses about the effects these genetic variants may have on the physical characteristics or behavior of modern humans, ranging from skin color to heightened allergies to …

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Chicago Humanities Festival: Are We the Last Neanderthals?

Neanderthals fascinate us: so much like us, yet not quite us. We have long known that they overlapped with modern humans in prehistoric Europe, but recent genetic evidence suggests widespread interbreeding of the two groups. University of Wisconsin biological anthropologist John Hawks is at the forefront of this species-shaking research. He presents the latest findings …

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Svante Pääbo: A Neanderthal Perspective on Human Origins

The Neanderthals are the closest extinct relatives of all present-day human and the Neanderthal genome sequence provides unique insights into modern humans origins. Svante Pääbo, a biologist and evolutionary anthropologist, describe the current understanding of the genetic contributions of Neanderthals to present-day humans and to extinct human groups. He also describes preliminary analyses of genomic …

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Oxford: Dating Neanderthals: new research published in Nature

Neanderthals and modern humans were both living in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years, according to a new paper published in the journal, Nature. A research team, led by Professor Thomas Higham of the University of Oxford, has constructed a robust timeline showing when the last Neanderthals died out. Significantly, they have strong evidence …

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Science Bulletins: Neanderthal DNA Persists in Humans

Published on Mar 7, 2014 When modern humans migrated out of Africa between 100,000 and 60,000 years ago, they encountered and bred with Neanderthals, our close relatives living in Europe and Asia. For people of non-African descent, approximately 2 percent of their genome has some Neanderthal DNA. New research is investigating which components of the …

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Svante Paabo: Archaic Genomics

Svante Paabo – Director, Department of Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany Hosted by Genome Canada. Featured image: Chris Stringers hypothesis of the family tree of genus Homo, published in Nature (“Evolution: What makes a modern human”). Homo floresiensis originated in an unknown location from unknown ancestors and reached remote parts of Indonesia. Homo erectus spread …

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Penn Museum: Harold Dibble: Did Neanderthals Bury Their Dead?

Dr. Harold Dibble discusses his research at several excavation sites including Roc de Marsal, France. The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Penn Museum has conducted more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world. Three …

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Dr. Jean-Jacques Hublin: Neanderthals Deciphered

Fora TV presents Dr. Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. He details the curious discovery of a genetic integration between Neanderthals and modern humans around 60,000 years ago. The Neanderthals are a now-extinct species or subspecies within the genus Homo and closely related to modern humans. They  partly evolved in and around Europe. The first proto-Neanderthal traits appeared in Europe as early …

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