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Tag: Christendom

KnowledgeHub: Why the Vikings Disappeared

KnowledgeHub investigates why the infamous warriors of the Middle Ages disappeared. Raiding the coasts of Europe, the age of Vikings lasted about 300 years. What caused the end of the Vikings age?  

History Buffs: Kingdom of Heaven

Still in grief over his wife’s sudden death, village blacksmith Balian (Orlando Bloom) joins his long-estranged father, Baron Godfrey (Liam Neeson), as a crusader on the road to Jerusalem. After a perilous journey to the holy city, the valiant young man enters the retinue of the leprous King Baldwin IV (Edward Norton), which is rife …

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Simon Fraser University: Niall Christie: The Crusades

Media portrayals of the Crusades depict them as fierce battles between Christian knights and Muslim warriors. Others suggest that they were an episode in a wider clash of civilizations between the Western Christian world and the Muslim Middle East. But are these depictions accurate? In this forum, which took place on September 11, 2011, at …

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Yale University: Anders Winroth | The Conversion of Scandinavia

Professor Winroth, who was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2003, specializes in the history of medieval Europe, especially religious, intellectual and legal history as well as the Viking Age. We talk with him about his new book, “The Conversion of Scandinavia: Vikings, Merchants, and Missionaries in the Remaking of Northern Europe,” which recently won the …

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Yale University: The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000 with Paul Freedman | 03/22 | Constantine and the Early Church

Professor Freedman examines how Christianity came to be the official religion of the Roman Empire. This process began seriously in 312, when the emperor Constantine converted after a divinely inspired victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge. Constantine’s conversion would have seemed foolish as a political strategy since Christianity represented a completely different system …

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Jessica Goldberg: Great Battles | The First Crusade Three Battles for Latin Christendom

From 1096 to 1101, over 100,000 people from all over Western Europe set off towards Jerusalem. These men and women, these warriors and pilgrims, priests and nuns, lords and laborers, didn’t have a name for what they were doing—no one would use the word Crusade to describe an armed pilgrimage, or holy military expedition, until …

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