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Tag: Cancer

TED: A new superweapon in the fight against cancer | Paula Hammond

Cancer is a very clever, adaptable disease. To defeat it, says medical researcher and educator Paula Hammond, we need a new and powerful mode of attack. With her colleagues at MIT, Hammond engineered a nanoparticle one-hundredth the size of a human hair that can treat the most aggressive, drug-resistant cancers. Learn more about this molecular …

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TED: Good news in the fight against pancreatic cancer | Laura Indolfi

Anyone who has lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer knows the devastating speed with which it can affect an otherwise healthy person. TED Fellow and biomedical entrepreneur Laura Indolfi is developing a revolutionary way to treat this complex and lethal disease: a drug delivery device that acts as a cage at the site of …

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Cancer Research UK : Finding immune cells that can tackle evolving cancers

Cancer Research UK scientists may have found the tools necessary to give immunotherapy the precision guidance that patients so desperately need.  

Harvard University: Visualizing cancer’s origins from the first affected cell

Researchers at Harvard-affiliated Boston Children’s Hospital have, for the first time, visualized the origins of cancer from the first affected cell and watched its spread in a live animal. Their work, published in the Jan. 29 issue of Science, could change the way scientists understand melanoma and other cancers and lead to new, early treatments …

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Harvard University: Cancer and Diet: The Latest on Processed Meats, Fats and More

This Forum explored what we know, and don’t know, about links between diet and cancer. Included in the discussion was the World Health Organization’s classification of processed meat as a “Group 1” carcinogen; the latest on what is known about fats and cancer; and the just-released Dietary Guidelines for Americans as they pertain to cancer …

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Tracing a cellular family tree

By combining sophisticated RNA sequencing technology with a new device that isolates single cells and their progeny, MIT researchers can now trace detailed family histories for several generations of cells descended from one “ancestor.” This technique could shed light on how cancer develops.  

Harvard University: How Coffee Loves Us Back

Coffee is everywhere, through history and across the world. And increasingly, science is demonstrating that its popularity is a good thing. Harvard scientists have for years put coffee under the microscope. Last year, researchers announced they had discovered six new human genes related to coffee and reconfirmed the existence of two others. The long-running Nurses’ …

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Nature: Tumour immunology and immunotherapy

This animation created by Nature Reviews Cancer and Nature Reviews Immunology illustrates how tumour cells are sensed and destroyed by cells of the immune system and how tumours can evolve to evade immune-mediated elimination. Scientists are developing new immunotherapies that help the immune system to ‘fight back’ — the animation explains how these exciting new …

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Cambridge University: Cytosponge – Early detection for oesophageal cancer

A ‘pill on a string’ developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge could help doctors detect oesophageal cancer – cancer of the gullet – at an early stage, helping them overcome the problem of wide variation between biopsies.  

BioMed Central: ‘Is cancer preventable?’ – Metabolism, Diet and Disease

Craig Thompson, Lewis Cantley, Steven McKnight, Michael Bishop and Eugene Fine discuss with other speakers and delegates at the second Metabolism Diet and Disease conference, held in Washington DC in May 2014, whether cancer can be prevented by diet, what the evidence is, and what research on metabolism and cancer has told us so far. …

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Rice University: New tactic targets brain tumors

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research at Rice University.  

Cambridge University: Killer T Cell: The Cancer Assassin

How does a Killer T Cell Kill its target? Our new film captures the behaviour of cytotoxic T cells – the body’s ‘serial killers’ – as they hunt down and eliminate cancer cells before moving on to their next target.  

HBO: VICE | Killing Cancer Debrief

“My life, like most people’s, has been negatively affected by cancer, and the thought of my young children living in an age where this is no longer humanity’s No. 1 health fear was simply overpowering.” – Shane Smith  

Tal Danino: We can use bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it)

Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was “programmed” to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we’re just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something …

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MIT: Detecting rare cancer cells with sound waves

A team of engineers from MIT, Penn State University, and Carnegie Mellon University is developing a novel way to isolate rare circulating tumor cells using sound waves to separate them from blood cells.  

Mayo Clinic: Measles Virus as a Cancer Fighter

A medical first — a woman with an incurable form of cancer has had all signs of living cancer cells eradicated from her body for at least 6 months. What’s more, it was accomplished in a single treatment. And the magic potion — was the measles virus. For more information or to schedule an appointment, …

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Cambridge University: PARP-inhibitors | A New Generation of Cancer Drugs

First of new generation of cancer drugs granted European approval A new drug for ovarian cancer, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge and AstraZeneca, has become the first of new class of drugs, known as PARP-inhibitors, to be granted approval anywhere in the world. The drug, Lynparza, has been granted Marketing Authorisation from …

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The Aspen Institute: Curing Cancer | How Close are We?

A conversation on the past, present and what the future holds for battling disease. With billions of dollars being spent in research and development each year, with thousands of grassroots and fundraising events focused on curing cancer being held each year, with science and technology rapidly evolving in every part of our lives, many Americans, …

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Jorge Soto: The future of early cancer detection?

Along with a crew of technologists and scientists, Jorge Soto is developing a simple, noninvasive, open-source test that looks for early signs of multiple forms of cancer. Onstage at TEDGlobal 2014, he demonstrates a working prototype of the mobile platform for the first time.  

Lawrence Fong: Harnessing the Immune System for Cancer Treatment

Dr. Lawrence Fong studies the interaction between the immune system and cancer which contributes to development of potential vaccine and immunotherapeutic strategies to treat cancer.  

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