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Tag: Ancient Greece

Beasts in the Night Sky: The Constellation Myths of Greece and Rome

In this lecture, Dr. Patrick Glauthier talk about monsters, Aries the Ram, Taurus the Bull, Cetus the Sea-monster – there are no shortage of mythical animals among the constellations of ancient Greece and Rome. Why do such creatures populate the heavens in the first place? And what did they mean to the societies that first …

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Penn Museum: Great Beasts of Legend: Centaurs, Sirens and Chimaera: The Greeks and their Monsters

Dr. Jeremy McInerney, Davidson Kennedy Professor Department of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania The Greek imagination was populated with all sorts of hybrids and monsters, from the half-horse, half man centaur to the chimaera, a blend of lion, snake and goat. What function did these creatures play in Greek culture? In this lecture we’ll look …

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TED-Ed: Plato’s best (and worst) ideas

Few individuals have influenced the world and many of today’s thinkers like Plato. He created the first Western university and was teacher to Ancient Greece’s greatest minds, including Aristotle. But even he wasn’t perfect. Along with his great ideas, Plato had a few that haven’t exactly stood the test of time. Wisecrack gives a brief …

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Gresham College: Professor Paul Cartledge | Ten Things You Really Should Know About Ancient Greek Democracy

Professor Paul Cartledge explores the democracy in ancient Greece and the origins of the word, and how that distinguishes from todays notion of democracy. Myths abound about ancient Greek democracy actually, there was no such thing. That is, there was no such one thing. Even Athens, which invented both the thing and the name, had …

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Nature video: Skeleton uncovered at ancient Antikythera shipwreck

The famous shipwreck that brought us the mysterious Antikythera mechanism has revealed a new secret: a two thousand year old human skeleton. The team hopes to extract DNA from the skull – a feat never attempted before on bones this old that have been underwater. More on the remarkable ancient computer, the Antikythera mechanism at …

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TED-Ed: Real life sunken cities

Though people are most familiar with Plato’s fictional Atlantis, many real underwater cities actually exist. Peter Campbell explains how sunken cities are studied by scientists to help us understand the lives of our ancestors, the dynamic nature of our planet, and the impact of each on the other. Check out this article on a real …

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Penn Museum: Great Myths and Legends: Warrior Women: Amazons and the Greek Imagination

Dr. Jeremy McInerney, Professor of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania This lecture considers the Amazons in Greek legend and art. Who were these warrior women and why did they remain a source of curiosity, wonder and fear in the Greek imagination?

Penn Museum: The Golden Age of King Midas

Midas was indisputably the most famous ruler of the Phrygian kingdom in central Turkey, and his Golden Touch made him an especially favorite subject in Greek legend. His first monumental project as king was a colossal tomb for his father (ca. 740 BCE) that was excavated by the University of Pennsylvania in 1957, and the …

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TED Ed: This is Sparta | Fierce warriors of the ancient world – Craig Zimmer

In ancient Greece, violent internal conflict between border neighbors and war with foreign invaders was a way of life, and Greeks were considered premier warriors. Sparta, specifically, had an army of the most feared warriors in the ancient world. What were they doing to produce such fierce soldiers? Craig Zimmer shares some of the lessons …

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PBS: Crash Course | Distances Astronomy #25

How do astronomers make sense out of the vastness of space? How do they study things so far away? Today Phil talks about distances, going back to early astronomy. Ancient Greeks were able to find the size of the Earth, and from that the distance to and the sizes of the Moon and Sun. Once …

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University of Edinburgh: Andrew Erskine – Roman Power, Greek Reaction

Andrew Erskine, Professor of Ancient History, delivered his inaugural lecture entitled “Roman power, Greek reaction”. Abstract At the beginning of second century BC, Rome announced that it had brought freedom to the Greeks. By the end of the century the Greeks were effectively the subjects of Rome. This lecture explores the Greek reaction to these …

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Penn Museum: Brian Rose | Great Wonders | The Mausoleum of Halicarnassus and its Successors

Each of the “wonders” in the ancient world was intended to symbolize the builder’s political and economic power, and to serve as a template for future monuments to such power. In most cases they succeeded: the statue of Olympian Zeus was used as a model for portraits of Napoleon and George Washington, while the Colossus …

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Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier: Greece and Asia in the Late Bronze Age | The Historical Background of Homer’s Iliad

Dr. Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier, Director of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens, speaks. In 1924, Swiss archaeologist Emil Forrer announced a new discovery relating to the Trojan War. After examining texts found at Hattusa, once the capital of the Hittite empire in Asia Minor, he identified the Hittite words for Troy (Wilusa) and Mycenaean Greece (Ahhiyawa), …

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Catherine Morgan: Why did early Greeks build temples?

Professor Catherine Morgan of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens (AAIA) delivers a public lecture at The Australian National University. Temples are nowadays taken for granted as essential features of Greek sanctuaries. Yet following the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces, the nature and function of buildings at cult sites varied greatly – and many sanctuaries …

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Ken Dowden: Greek Mythology 3500 BC to AD 2014

Professor Ken Dowden delivers the Birmingham and Midlands Classical Association’s New Year lecture. Where do Greek myths come from? How, and when, are they created? What is the point of them? Why haven’t they passed away like the Ancient Greeks themselves? Are there modern ‘mythologies’ in the same sense as Greek mythology? Lecture hosted by …

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Brian Rose: Great Voyages: Jason and the Golden Fleece

Brian Rose, James B. Pritchard Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania. Searching for the Golden Fleece with Jason and the Argonauts One of the most captivating voyages in Classical literature involved the travels of the Greek hero Jason to the Black Sea, where he searched for the golden fleece of a winged ram that …

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Jeremy McInerny: Great Battles: Thermopylae: The Battle for Europe?

Dr. Jeremy McInerny, Professor of Classical Studies, examines the tactics and strategy of the Battle of Thermopylae (in present-day Greece) in 480 BCE. Why was the battle fought at this location and was it, as it is often portrayed, a turning point in the confrontation of East and West? This lecture puts the Battle of …

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Peter Struck: Great Voyages: The Odyssey, Nostalgia, and the Lost Home

Published on Apr 4, 2014 Homer’s tale of the wandering hero has loaned its name to the English language for the very idea of a long wandering voyage. In this talk, Dr. Struck considers the idea of a displacement in the epic poem, and how Odysseus negotiates his status as someone separated from where he …

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Brian Rose: The Trojan War – Myth or Fact

Dr. C. Brian Rose, Deputy Director of the Penn Museum discusses excavations at Troy over the past twenty years. A new digital imaging technique shows a cross section of nine settlements dating from the beginning of the Bronze Age (ca. 3,000 B.C.) through the end of the Byzantine period (ca. 1400 A.D.) The University of …

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Earth from Space: City of knowledge

Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Explore Athens, the capital and largest city of Greece, in this edition.