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Tag: AMNH: Science Bulletins

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: The Hunt for Planet X

A large, unseen planet may be lurking in the cold, dim reaches of our solar system. Using a combination of theory and observation, scientists have estimated the mass, distance and orbital period of a proposed “Planet X.”  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—A Closer Look (3 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—A Closer Look (2 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—For the Future (1 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

AMNH: Science Bulletins | Scientists Save Penguin Chicks

African penguins are critically endangered, their colonies reduced by 70 percent in the last decade. Commercial fishing is to blame, emptying the penguins’ ocean range of the small, schooling fish that are their main food source. With penguin chicks’ growth and health in crisis, a hands-on rescue strategy could sustain struggling colonies while conservationists work …

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AMNH: Science Bulletins | Focus on Mars

This month’s Astro News features a roundup of Mars stories: • A high-resolution map of Mars’s surface shows geologic structures in more detail than ever before. • Two missions—MOM and MAVEN—made orbit around the Red Planet. • 900 images are assembled to create a billion-pixel panorama of Gale Crater.  

AMNH: Science Bulletins | Egg Patterns Identify Intruders

When cuckoos lay eggs in other birds’ nests, they produce eggs similar in color and pattern to the hosts’ own. With the help of a new computer program, scientists analyze egg patterns to see how certain details could help host birds detect an imposter.  

AMNH: Science Bulletins | Rosetta Mission Lands Probe on Comet

On November 12, 2014, more than a decade after launching, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission was positioned to send a probe to the surface of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, a small comet orbiting the Sun at a distance of hundreds of millions of kilometers. After a tense 7-hour descent (and a 30-minute transmission delay), mission control confirmed …

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ANHM: Science Bulletins | The Rise of Fire

Wildfires, whether ignited by lightning or people, show global patterns that are visible to satellites. In the United States, fire is increasing: on average, millions more acres burn each year than was typical a few decades ago, and fire season is longer. Prolonged drought in the West, provoked by climate change, is encouraging this rise …

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AMNH: Science Bulletins | Field Notes from Madagascar

Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History conduct studies all over the world during their annual field seasons. In this episode of “Field Notes,” we trek into the jungles of Madagascar with two museum biologists in search of strange and unusual reptiles.  

AMNH: Science Bulletins | The Expanding Universe

In 1998, astrophysicists discovered a baffling phenomenon: the Universe is expanding at an ever-faster rate. Either an enigmatic force called dark energy is to blameor a reworking of gravitational theory is in order. In this new Science Bulletins video, watch a Fermilab team assemble the Dark Energy Camera, a device that could finally solve this …

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Science Bulletins: Chernobyl’s Birds Adapt to Radiation

The Chernobyl nuclear disaster had a high ecological cost, with local wildlife suffering from physical deformities and reduced populations. The site has since emerged as a unique environment for scientists to study the long-term effects of continuous radiation exposure on plants and animals. A recent study showed that many bird species are surprisingly adaptable to …

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Science Bulletins: Early Migration for Modern Humans

When did modern humans make their first appearance in Europe? A jawbone excavated in England and two molars found in southern Italy suggest that modern humans migrated northward thousands of years earlier than previously thought. These fossils were discovered and interpreted decades ago but recent analysis pushed back the age of the jawbone, while positively …

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Science Bulletins: Deciphering History’s Deadliest Pandemic

The unusual severity of 1918’s “Spanish flu” pandemic has eluded explanation for nearly a century. Unlike typical flu epidemics, most of the victims in 1918 were otherwise healthy adults that succumbed to secondary infections. Unexpectedly, children and the elderly frequently recovered. The answer may lie in the 1918 flu’s evolutionary relationship to other flu strains …

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Science Bulletins: Habitat Corridors Benefit Isolated Plants

In many open habitats, more than one-third of seeds are wind-dispersed. For isolated patches of plants, the interaction of wind with the landscape can determine where the plants are able to spread and survive. Scientists spent more than a decade studying seed movement in grassland plots to evaluate how habitat “corridors” affect plant dispersal and …

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Science Bulletins: Biodiversity Unveiled | New Animal Discoveries of 2013

From legless lizards to purring monkeys, scientists described thousands of unique animal species in 2013. Some species-rich regions like the Amazon basin yielded hundreds of discoveries, while museum collections provided genetic information that allowed scientists to describe hundreds more. Over 1.6 million species of animal life are currently known, but global biodiversity is estimated to …

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