web analytics

Tag: American Museum of Natural History

American Museum of Natural History: 2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: De-Extinction

The 2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate at the American Museum of Natural History with host Neil deGrasse Tyson and a panel of experts for a lively debate about the merits and shortcomings of a provocative idea: de-extinction. Biologists today have the knowledge, the tools, and the ability to influence the evolution of life on Earth. …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe Special Event | Zika: What You Need to Know

You’ve heard the warnings: Zika is coming. There are a slew of guidelines for pregnant women, but how should the rest of us prepare for the arrival of this virus? What can science tell us about the Aedes mosquito that spreads Zika? And what steps are being taken to halt mosquito-borne viruses? In this podcast, …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History

AMNH scientists use genetic testing and advanced imaging techniques to “dissect” the tiny, rare, and fragile pocket shark. To learn about its mysterious behaviors, however, researchers will have to observe a living pocket shark in its natural setting.

American Museum of Natural History: Addiction and the Brain

Only a small percentage of people who try an illicit drug will go on to develop addiction. What makes one more vulnerable to addiction than another? Theories abound, from troubled childhoods to work stress to genetics. Psychiatrist Edmund Griffin explains how epidemiology, cocaine-addicted rats, and molecular neuroscience all help to shed light on one of …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites

Happy Cephalopod Week! When you think of an ammonite, you probably think of a spiral-shelled sea creature. But in fact, this was just one of the many shapes that ammonites took. Museum Curator Neil Landman explains how this array of shapes once confounded evolutionary biologists, and why this variety is actually a good example of …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Sea Creatures Face the Acid Test

An AMNH scientist digs into the fossil record to discover why ammonites, a highly successful group of mollusks, perished after an asteroid strike 65 million years ago, while their cousins the nautilids became unlikely survivors. The answer—ammonites’ vulnerability to ocean acidification—highlights the unpredictable nature of mass extinction events. When an environment changes dramatically, winners and …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Is the Universe a Simulation?

What may have started as a science fiction speculation—that perhaps the universe as we know it is a computer simulation—has become a serious line of theoretical and experimental investigation among physicists, astrophysicists, and philosophers. Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, hosts and moderates a panel of experts in a lively …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe | Swarms of Aerial Robots

Autonomous aerial robots, commonly referred to as drones, could soon be used for search and rescue, first response, and precision farming. Join roboticist Vijay Kumar, dean and professor of engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, as he describes the advantages and the challenges of coordinating and controlling teams of small robots.  

American Museum of Natural History: Transformation: Dinosaurs to Birds

This spellbinding animation from the Museum’s new exhibition “Dinosaurs Among Us” traces the evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds.  

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe: Mending a Broken Heart

How can doctors repair damaged cardiac tissue while the heart still beats and pumps blood? Join stem cell researcher Jeffrey Karp to understand how scientists are drawing inspiration from nature to solve medical problems in new and exciting ways.  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: The Hunt for Planet X

A large, unseen planet may be lurking in the cold, dim reaches of our solar system. Using a combination of theory and observation, scientists have estimated the mass, distance and orbital period of a proposed “Planet X.”  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—A Closer Look (3 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—A Closer Look (2 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

American Museum of Natural History: Science Bulletins: Super Corals—For the Future (1 of 3)

Marine biologists in Hawaii investigate so-called “super corals,” which thrive even as ocean temperatures rise. In For the Future, learn how corals create underwater cities bustling with life, and explore a reef where healthy and dying corals live side by side.  

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe: Microbes in the House

Americans spend an estimated 92% of their time indoors, yet we know little about the diversity of microbes that exist in the built environment. This collection of microbes is influenced by where we live, whom we live with, and what we do, but it also can have an effect on us and our health. In …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: How Are Large Asteroids Tracked?

Since 2005, when the U.S. Congress mandated that NASA identify and track all near-Earth objects that are larger than 140 meters (approximately the diameter of a football field), professional and amateur astronomers have kept a tally of all potential earth-crossers. Meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, explains how Near-Earth Objects …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: Why Are There No Planets in the Asteroid Belt?

The asteroid belt provides important clues into the history of our solar system. Meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, explains different theories of solar system formation and how the asteroid belt figures into the stable configuration of planets that we know today.  

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe | Mollusks to Medicine

When you think of venomous animals, you imagine snakes, spiders, or scorpions – not snails. In this SciCafe, Mandë Holford, a research associate at the Museum and Associate Professor of chemical biology at Hunter College, discusses her research on predatory marine snails, the toxins they produce, and how those toxins are being used in the …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe: Why Walk on Two Legs? The Pros and Cons of Bipedalism

  Walking on two legs, or “bipedalism,” is a key characteristic defining humans and our early ancestors. But what an odd way to walk and run! Join Museum Curator Brian Richmond and Boston University anthropologist Jeremy DeSilva in exploring the great advantages of walking on two legs, as well as the unfortunate consequences of evolving …

Continue reading

American Museum of Natural History: Deflecting Asteroids | Protecting the Earth from Future Catastrophic Events

Will we be able to avoid a repeat of the Tunguska event? Or perhaps even the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event? Although massive asteroid impacts on Earth are rare, astronomers have identified thousands of asteroids close enough to Earth to be potentially hazardous. Learn from meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, Curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, how …

Continue reading

1 2 3