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Joel Achenbach and Andy Weir on Getting Humans to Mars

This is a panel discussion with Joel Achenbach and Andy Weir on the potential of getting humans to Mars.

Joel Achenbach is an American staff writer for The Washington Post and the author of seven books, including A Hole at the Bottom of the Sea, The Grand Idea, Captured by Aliens and It Looks Like a President only Smaller.

Andy Weir is an American novelist whose debut novel, The Martian, was later adapted into a film of the same name directed by Ridley Scott in 2015. Before becoming an author, Weir worked as a programmer for several software companies, including AOL, Palm, MobileIron and Blizzard, where he worked on the video game Warcraft II: Tides of Darkness.

Andy Weir’s newest novel was announced today, and it’s about Moon crimes. The book is called ‘Artemisä and will be released on November 14. With the official announcement, comes official details:

Artemis introduces a protagonist every bit as memorable as The Martian’s Mark Watney: Jasmine Bashara, aka Jazz. Jazz is just another too-smart, directionless twentysomething, chafing at the constraints of her small town and dreaming of a better life. Except the small town happens to be named Artemis—and it’s the first and only city on the moon.

Life on Artemis is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire, and Jazz is decidedly not a member of either category. She’s got debts to pay, her job as a porter barely covers the rent, and her budding career as a smuggler isn’t exactly setting her up as a kingpin, much to her disappointment. So when the chance at a life-changing score drops in her lap, Jazz can’t say no, even though she’s sure there’s more to the setup than meets the eye. And indeed, pulling off the perfect crime is just the first of Jazz’s problems as she finds herself in the middle of a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself.

The Humans to Mars Summit (H2M) is a comprehensive Mars exploration conference that addresses the major technical, scientific, and policy challenges of getting humans to Mars, as well as how such missions can have positive impacts on STEM education, American competitiveness and other important collateral issues.

 

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