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Lawrence Krauss: Life, the Universe, and Nothing: A Cosmic Mystery Story

An estimated 10,000 galaxies are revealed in humankind's deepest portrait of the visible universe ever. View a full size version of this image, or a slightly farther look with Hubble's infrared camera, in medium or large format. Photo credit: NASA/ESA/S. Beckwith(STScI) and The HUDF Team.

An estimated 10,000 galaxies are revealed in this, the so far, deepest portrait of the visible universe ever, by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/ESA/S. Beckwith(STScI) and The HUDF Team.

Webcast sponsored by Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Vancouver Institute. Lawrence Krauss’ work has been primarily in theoretical (as opposed to experimental) physics, and he has published research on a great variety of topics within that field.

Krauss is a renowned cosmologist and popularizer of modern science and director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University.

Krauss ultimately tackles the age-old assumption that something cannot arise from nothing by arguing that not only can something arise from nothing, but something will always arise from nothing.

The University of British Columbia (UBC), is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40 best universities in the world.

Illustration of spacetime curvature. General relativity generalizes special relativity and Newton's law of universal gravitation, providing a unified description of gravity as a geometric property of space and time, or spacetime. Credit: Johnstone

Article featured image to the right. An illustration of spacetime curvature. As general relativity generalizes special relativity and Newton’s law of universal gravitation it provides a unified description of gravity as a geometric property of space and time, or spacetime. Credit: Johnstone.

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