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Category: Space: Astronomy

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Juno Captures the “Roar” of Jupiter

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has crossed the boundary of Jupiter’s immense magnetic field. Juno’s Waves instrument recorded the encounter with the bow shock over the course of about two hours on June 24, 2016. “Bow shock” is where the supersonic solar wind is heated and slowed by Jupiter’s magnetosphere. It is analogous to a sonic boom …

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Lund University: Planet 9 was most likely stolen by our sun 4.5 billion years ago

Through a computer-simulated study, astronomers at Lund University in Sweden show that it is highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 is an exoplanet. This would make it the first exoplanet to be discovered inside our own solar system. The theory is that our sun, in its youth some 4.5 billion years ago, stole Planet …

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NASA: New Horizons’ Extreme Close-Up of Pluto’s Surface

This is the most detailed view of Pluto’s terrain you’ll see for a very long time. This mosaic strip – extending across the hemisphere that faced the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015 – now includes all of the highest-resolution images taken by the NASA probe. With a resolution …

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Titan Submarine: Exploring the Depths of Kraken Mare

What would a submarine to explore the liquid methane seas of Saturn’s Moon Titan look like? This video shows one submarine concept that would explore both the shoreline and the depths of this strange world that has methane rain, rivers and seas! The design was developed for the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Program, by …

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Life Noggin: How Extreme Is The Weather In Our Universe?

Here’s a new clip from the youtube channel Life Noggin and in this episode is on the topic of weather, weather in other parts of our universe, and after seeing it so we can probably agree that we have it decently good here on earth .

NASA Goddard: NASA’s SDO Captures Mercury Transit Time-lapse

Around 13 times per century, Mercury passes between Earth and the sun in a rare astronomical event known as a planetary transit. The 2016 Mercury transit occurred on May 9, between roughly 7:12 a.m. and 2:42 p.m. EDT.

NASA’s 4K View of April 17 Solar Flare

On April 17, 2016, an active region on the sun’s right side released a mid-level solar flare, captured here by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. This solar flare caused moderate radio blackouts, according to NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center. Scientists study active regions – which are areas of intense magnetism – to better understand why they …

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Hubble Space Telescope: Zoom Into the Center of Our Galaxy

This video sequence zooms into the Hubble Space Telescope view of the galactic core. Hubble’s infrared vision pierced the dusty heart of our Milky Way galaxy to reveal more than half a million stars at its core. Except for a few blue, foreground stars, the stars are part of the Milky Way’s nuclear star cluster, …

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TED: The most mysterious star in the universe | Tabetha Boyajian

Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea …

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Harvard University: Cara Battersby: The Wild West of Star Formation

We saddle up to explore the extreme center of our Milky Way galaxy – one of the wildest sections of the outer-space frontier. Our Galactic center is a chaotic region containing dense gas, stars, and the biggest bully around these parts: a supermassive black hole. The normal rules for star formation don’t apply here, and …

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The Network Behind the Cosmic Web

The concept of the cosmic web—viewing the universe as a set of discrete galaxies held together by gravity—is deeply ingrained in cosmology. Yet, little is known about architecture of this network or its characteristics. Our research used data from 24,000 galaxies to construct multiple models of the cosmic web, offering complex blueprints for how galaxies …

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SVAstronomyLectures: Report from the Planetary Frontier: The Latest from New Horizons at Pluto

On July 14, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew 7,800 mi above the surface of Pluto and sent back fascinating images of the dwarf planet and its large (and intriguing) moon Charon. Many of the images show unexpected beauty and complexity on Pluto’s surface. While the data are still coming in from the encounter, Dr. …

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Gresham College: Why Society Needs Astronomy and Cosmology – Dr Roberto Trotta

Fundamental research into astronomy, cosmology and particle physics is a luxury that humankind cannot do without. The cultural, technological and scientific returns far outweigh the costs…  

Cambridge University: 55 Cancri e

Artist’s impression of 55 Cancri e orbiting its parent star. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech The most detailed map of a small, rocky ‘super Earth’ to date reveals a planet almost completely covered by lava, with a molten ‘hot’ side and solid ‘cool’ side.  

PBS: How Cosmic Inflation Flattened the Universe | Space Time

Although much of the Big Bang Theory is widely accepted to be true, it only gets us part of the way there. Observable truths such as the CMB and the flatness of our universe reveal that there is no way the universe has been expanding at a constant rate since its beginning. It turns out …

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Harvard University: Where Do Planets Come From with Anjali Tripathi | CfA

Understanding the birthplaces of planets is an ongoing mystery. Planets have been predicted to form from disks of gas and dust around young stars. New observations of these protoplanetary disks offer exciting evidence for planet formation in action. Speaker: Anjali Tripathi  

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Unveiling Ceres

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has revealed marvelous sights on dwarf planet Ceres during its first year in orbit, including the mysterious bright spots in Occator Crater.  

NASA’s Ames Research Center: Caught for the First Time: The Early Flash of an Exploding Star

The brilliant flash of an exploding star’s shockwave—what astronomers call the “shock breakout” — is illustrated in this cartoon animation. The animation begins with a view of a red supergiant star that is 500 times bigger and 20,000 brighter than our sun. When the star’s internal furnace can no longer sustain nuclear fusion its core …

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WIRED: Meet the NASA Scientist Who Tracks Dangerous Asteroids in Earth’s Orbit

As a physicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Marina Brozovic studies and measures near-earth asteroids—you know, the ones that can potentially cause catastrophic damage. Watch as Brozovic explains how her team tracks the orbit of these large masses and how NASA would prepare if one were to come barreling towards earth.  

NASA : What’s New in Aerospace | Our Changing Moon

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) is the focus of this episode of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s “What’s New in Aerospace?” series. This program featured NASA’s Director of the Planetary Science, Jim Green and Tom Watters, a senior scientist with the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies. The pair discussed new evidence …

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