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Category: Life

TED: The era of personal DNA testing is here | Sebastian Kraves

From improving vaccines to modifying crops to solving crimes, DNA technology has transformed our world. Now, for the first time in history, anyone can experiment with DNA at home, in their kitchen, using a device smaller than a shoebox. We are living in a personal DNA revolution, says biotech entrepreneur Sebastian Kraves, where the secrets …

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ASU Origins Project: Mariette DiChristina & Lawrence Krauss: An Origins Project Dialog (2/2)

Join us for an evening with trailblazing science journalist and Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina and Origins Project director Lawrence Krauss for an enlightening evening on the role of science in our life. Watch as DiChristina and Krauss discuss how to better fuse the relationship between science and journalism in the digital age, the importance …

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ASU Origins Project: Mariette DiChristina & Lawrence Krauss: An Origins Project Dialog (1/2)

Join us for an evening with trailblazing science journalist and Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina and Origins Project director Lawrence Krauss for an enlightening evening on the role of science in our life. Watch as DiChristina and Krauss discuss how to better fuse the relationship between science and journalism in the digital age, the importance …

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Science Magazine: Humans aren’t the only great apes that can ‘read minds’

For years, only humans were thought to have this key cognitive skill of attributing “false belief,” which is believed to underlie deception, empathy, teaching, and perhaps even language. But three species of great apes—chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans—also know when someone holds a false belief, according to a new study published today in Science. The groundbreaking …

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TED-Ed: How does the Nobel Peace Prize work?

Among the top prestigious awards in the world, the Nobel Peace Prize has honored some of the most celebrated and revered international figures and organizations in history. But how does the nomination process work? And who exactly is eligible? Adeline Cuvelier and Toril Rokseth detail the specifics of the Nobel Peace Prize.  

Nature Video: Where to put the next billion people

A paper published this week examines this very question. As the world’s population is set to increase by one billion by 2030. Urban region planning requires a new mix of expertise. Essential are experts in: ecosystem and landscape ecology, water quantity and quality, agricultural soil quality and productivity, economics, transportation infrastructure engineering and community development. …

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TED-Ed: What would happen if you didn’t sleep?

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep.  

Science Magazine: Most cones don’t really see color

We see color because of specialized light-sensing cells in our eyes called cones. One type, L-cones, sees the reds of strawberries and fire trucks; M-cones detect green leaves, and S-cones let us know the sky is blue. But vision scientists have now discovered that not all cones sense color  

Conservation International: A undersea volcano teeming with alien life forms

Last week, Conservation International scientists and researchers from the University of Hawaii embarked on a journey to dive the Cook and Lo’ihi seamounts off the coast of the Big Island of Hawaii. These undersea mountains, some of which have never before been explored, are hotspots of life and vital to ocean health. Among some amazing …

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VOX: How saber-toothed cats grew their mouth swords

The saber-toothed cat Smilodon fatalis roamed America during the Pleistocene before going extinct about 10,000 years ago. A top predator, Smilodon seemed to use its sabers to slit the throats of its prey (terrifying!). A new paper published in the journal PLoS ONE investigates how the sabers developed — and found the sabers grew almost …

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Nature video: Rare crow shows a talent for tool use

For decades the New Caledonian crow has taken the crown of top corvid tool-user. Now experiments on the rare Hawaiian crow, or Alala, suggest that they too could be natural tool-users.  

Spectacular drone footage features three whales checking out a boat

Wam Wamland shot the footage during a sea trip in New Caledonia in the South Pacific, he writes; Whales have offered a water ballet far beyond our expectations … Our drone has not lost a thing! They came directly toward us and have tours around the boat stopped, we determined to line their eyes! After …

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Science Magazine: Your dog understands more than you think

New research shows that dogs do not only listen to people’s voices but also understands the words we are saying. Want to know more? Then, head to this article Dogs don’t just hear what we’re saying, but also how we’re saying it.  

TED: A new way to study the brain’s invisible secrets | Ed Boyden

Neuroengineer Ed Boyden wants to know how the tiny biomolecules in our brains generate emotions, thoughts and feelings — and he wants to find the molecular changes that lead to disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s. Rather than magnify these invisible structures with a microscope, he wondered: What if we physically enlarge them and make them …

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Nature video: Printing Lucy

Researchers believe they’ve discovered how Lucy, a 3.2 million year old human relative, died. To convince others of their theory, the researchers released 3D scans of Lucy’s bones. In this Nature Video we 3D print Lucy’s bones to see for ourselves.  

TED-Ed: How do animals see in the dark?

To human eyes, the world at night is a formless canvas of grey. Many nocturnal animals, on the other hand, experience a rich and varied world, bursting with details, shapes, and colors. What is it, then, that separates moths from men? Anna Stöckl uncovers the science behind night vision.  

University of California: Neandertal Denisovan Human Interbreeding

This symposium brings together researchers at the forefront of ancient DNA research and population genetics to discuss current developments and share insights about human migration and adaptation.  

TED Ed: How a single-celled organism almost wiped out life on Earth

There’s an organism that changed the world. It caused the first mass extinction in Earth’s history … and also paved the way for complex life. How? Anusuya Willis explains how cyanobacteria, simple organisms that don’t even have nuclei or any other organelles, wrote a pivotal chapter in the story of life on Earth.  

Natural History Museum: How does the human eye work?

Dr Ben Price explores the inner workings of human and dragonfly eyes and vision. Comparing them offers a new perspective on the visual capabilities of both.  

Science Magazine: Why sunflowers follow the sun

Throughout their youth, sunflowers track the sun from east to west and turn back east overnight to await the sun. But what do they get out of it?  

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