web analytics

Category: History: Prehistory

Brian Rose: Great Riddles in Archaeology – Atlantis: The Lost Continent?

When the Greek philosopher Plato first described an advanced civilization that sank beneath the ocean thousands of years ago, most listeners did not take it seriously. But the story acquired new popularity in the 20th century, and explorers have continually looked for evidence of its existence. Dr. C. Brian Rose, Curator, Mediterranean Section, speaks. Sound …

Continue reading

Penn Museum: Harold Dibble: Did Neanderthals Bury Their Dead?

Dr. Harold Dibble discusses his research at several excavation sites including Roc de Marsal, France. The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Penn Museum has conducted more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world. Three …

Continue reading

UCLA: Chris Stringe | The Origin of Us | Fossil Record of Anatomically Modern Humans

This series “The Origin of Us” is hosted by the University of California takes a fresh look at the questions of where we come from with a critical examination of the available evidence from multiple sources. Evidence points strongly to Africa as the major center for the genetic, physical and behavioral origins of both ancient …

Continue reading

The Origin of Us – Spread of Humans Ancient African Languages Stone Tools and Cognition

One of the enduring questions of human origins is when, where and how we “Behaviorally Modern Humans” emerged and why and how we eventually replaced all the other human-like species. This series is hosted by the University of California takes a fresh look at the questions of where we come from with a critical examination …

Continue reading

The Origin of Us – Fossils of Modern Humans Interbreeding within and outside of Africa

Some enduring questions of human origins is when, where and how we “Behaviorally Modern Humans” emerged and why and how we eventually replaced all the other human-like species. This series hosted by The University of California takes a fresh look at the situation today with a critical examination of the available evidence from multiple sources. Chris …

Continue reading

UCLA: Lyn Wadlay | The Origin of Us: African Climate of the Last 400000 Years East African and South African Evidence

One of the enduring questions of human origins is when, where and how we “Behaviorally Modern Humans” emerged and why and how we eventually replaced all the other human-like species. This series hosted by the University of California with Rick Potts (Smithsonian Institution) leads off with a talk about African Climate of the Last 400,000 Years, …

Continue reading

UCLA: Sarah Tishkoff | CARTA | Culture-Gene Interactions

There are individuals who maintain the ability to digest milk into adulthood due to a genetic adaptation in populations that have a history of pastoralism. Sarah Tishkoff from the University of Pennsylvania presents her latest studies of the genetic basis of lactose tolerance in African pastoralist populations. Her team has identified several mutations that arose …

Continue reading

UCLA: CARTA: The Evolution of Human Nutrition

Tracing the evolution of the human diet from our earliest ancestors can lead to a better understanding of human adaptation in the past. It may also offer clues to the origin of many health problems we currently face, such as obesity and chronic disease. University of California presents; Steven Leigh (Univ of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) …

Continue reading

Dr. Jean-Jacques Hublin: Neanderthals Deciphered

Fora TV presents Dr. Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. He details the curious discovery of a genetic integration between Neanderthals and modern humans around 60,000 years ago. The Neanderthals are a now-extinct species or subspecies within the genus Homo and closely related to modern humans. They  partly evolved in and around Europe. The first proto-Neanderthal traits appeared in Europe as early …

Continue reading

AMNH: Who Was the Hobbit?

  Ian Tattersall, paleoanthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, describes the discovery of the LB1 bones (nicknamed the “hobbit”), and the mystery surrounding the nearly complete skeleton. Two biological anthropologists try lifting the veil obscuring one of paleoanthropology’s intriguing mysteries in this light-hearted debate: who was the hobbit? Found on an …

Continue reading

1 2 3