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Category: Health

TED: This tiny particle could roam your body to find tumors | Sangeeta Bhatia

What if we could find cancerous tumors years before they can harm us — without expensive screening facilities or even steady electricity? Physician, bioengineer and entrepreneur Sangeeta Bhatia leads a multidisciplinary lab that searches for novel ways to understand, diagnose and treat human disease. Her target: the two-thirds of deaths due to cancer that she …

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TED: We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez

For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. …

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TED: A new superweapon in the fight against cancer | Paula Hammond

Cancer is a very clever, adaptable disease. To defeat it, says medical researcher and educator Paula Hammond, we need a new and powerful mode of attack. With her colleagues at MIT, Hammond engineered a nanoparticle one-hundredth the size of a human hair that can treat the most aggressive, drug-resistant cancers. Learn more about this molecular …

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TED: Gene editing can now change an entire species — forever | Jennifer Kahn

CRISPR gene drives allow scientists to change sequences of DNA and guarantee that the resulting edited genetic trait is inherited by future generations, opening up the possibility of altering entire species forever. More than anything, this technology has led to questions: How will this new power affect humanity? What are we going to use it …

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TED: Good news in the fight against pancreatic cancer | Laura Indolfi

Anyone who has lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer knows the devastating speed with which it can affect an otherwise healthy person. TED Fellow and biomedical entrepreneur Laura Indolfi is developing a revolutionary way to treat this complex and lethal disease: a drug delivery device that acts as a cage at the site of …

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Cambridge University : How dogs can sniff out diabetes

A chemical found in our breath could provide a flag to warn of dangerously-low blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to new research the University of Cambridge. The finding, published today in the journal Diabetes Care, could explain why some dogs can be trained to spot the warning signs in patients. …

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MIT: Ingestible origami robot Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Researchers at MIT, the University of Sheffield, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated a tiny origami robot that can unfold itself from a swallowed capsule and, steered by external magnetic fields, crawl across the stomach wall to remove a swallowed button battery or patch a wound.

American Museum of Natural History: Christina Warinner | How “Paleo” is Your Diet?

Evolutionary biologists argue that no study of human health or evolution is complete without considering the trillions of microbes that live in us or on us—our microbiome. In this SciCafe, join molecular anthropologist Christina Warinner as she explores how scientists are reconstructing the ancestral human microbiome to better understand the lives and health of our …

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SignAloud: Gloves that Translate Sign Language into Text and Speech

Thomas Pryor and Navid Azodi, University of Washington (Seattle, Wash.) $10,000 Lemelson-MIT “Use it!” Undergraduate Winners  

Nature Video: The nerve bypass: how to move a paralysed hand

After a broken neck left him quadriplegic, Ian Burkhart was told he would never be able to use his hands. Now he can grasp a bottle and pick up a credit card by using a computer plugged directly into his brain. Special software is able to decode his thoughts and convert them into electrical signals …

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ABC News: Paralyzed Man Uses Brainwaves to Play Video Games

A chip implanted in Ian Burkhart’s brain allows him to move his hands using his own thoughts. A paralysed man has walked again using the power of thought. In a world first, the 26-year-old’s brain waves were harnessed to allow him to move his own legs.  

TED: How to spot a fad diet – Mia Nacamulli

Conventional wisdom about diets, including government health recommendations, seems to change all the time. And yet ads routinely come out claiming to have THE answer about what we should eat. So how do we distinguish what’s actually healthy from what advertisers just want us to believe is good for us? Mia Nacamulli gives the facts …

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VOX: Our sterile homes might be giving us seasonal allergies

Seasonal allergies are the worst. Video by Gina Barton and Liz Scheltens Millions of Americans suffer from seasonal allergies. There isn’t a clear-cut answer as to why some people have them while others don’t but scientists do have one particular theory. The hygiene hypothesis is the idea that excessively sterile environments are contributing to the …

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Lund University: New ultrasound method creates a better picture of cardiovascular health

Researchers at Lund University have discovered a new and more accurate way to distinguish between harmful and harmless plaque in the blood vessels by using ultrasound. This can help healthcare providers determine the risk of strokes and heart attacks – which means avoiding unnecessary surgery for many patients.  

Slush: Fireside at Slush 2015 | Cancer Immunotherapy with Oncolytic Viruses

Fireside chat with Akseli Hemminki (TILT therapeutics) & Timo Ahopelto (Lifeline Ventures) at Slush 2015.  

Vein Viewer

To give blood is probably something that most of us think is quite unpleasant and when its difficult to find a decent vein, it can be even worse. Using this gizmo called VeinViewer it may be easier to find a vein.  

Gresham College: Germs, Genes and Genesis: The History of Infectious Disease – Professor Steve Jones

We have an idea of where to place the cradle of civilization, but where is the cradle of disease? Where do infectious diseases come from? Some come from animals, but we gave some back (as cattle picked up TB from farmers). Leviticus discusses the problem of leprosy at some length and even develops an early …

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TED: The brain may be able to repair itself — with help | Jocelyne Bloch

Through treating everything from strokes to car accident traumas, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch knows the brain’s inability to repair itself all too well. But now, she suggests, she and her colleagues may have found the key to neural repair: Doublecortin-positive cells. Similar to stem cells, they are extremely adaptable and, when extracted from a brain, cultured …

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Harvard University: Printing Vascular Tissue

Printing vessel vasculature is essential for sustaining functional living tissues. Until now, bioengineers have had difficulty building thick tissues, lacking a method to embed vascular networks. A 3D bioprinting method invented at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS embeds a grid of vasculature into thick tissue laden with human stem cells and connective matrix. Printed …

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École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne: Amputee Feels Texture with a Bionic Fingertip

An amputee feels rough or smooth textures in real-time — with his phantom hand — using an artificial fingertip connected to nerves in the arm. The advancement will accelerate the development of touch enabled prosthetics.  

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