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Category: Health

TED: What you need to know about CRISPR | Ellen Jorgensen

Should we bring back the wooly mammoth? Or edit a human embryo? Or wipe out an entire species that we consider harmful? The genome-editing technology CRISPR has made extraordinary questions like these legitimate — but how does it work? Scientist and community lab advocate Ellen Jorgensen is on a mission to explain the myths and …

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Harvard University: 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip with integrated sensors

Harvard University researchers have made the first entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing. Built by a fully automated, digital manufacturing procedure, the 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip can be quickly fabricated and customized, allowing researchers to easily collect reliable data for short-term and long-term studies.  

Nature video: Mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial diseases are a group of disorders caused by genetic mutations. In this animation, Nature Video finds out how these diseases arise, and how new techniques can stop them being passed on from mother to child.  

Discovery News: Is The Next Antibiotic Hiding Deep Within The Ocean?

What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform … everything. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov walks us through examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative …

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University of Oxford: Good Germs; Bad Germs

Invisible to the naked eye, yet a constant presence, microbes (‘germs’) live in, on and around us. The researchers in this project collaborate with members of the public to explore and experiment on the microbial life in their kitchens (and in one instance – a cat) and starts to unpick what we really mean by …

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Science Magazine: Print-on-demand bone could quickly mend major injuries

Material is flexible, cheap, and easy to produce. If you shatter a bone in the future, a 3D printer and some special ink could be your best medicine. Researchers have created what they call “hyperelastic bone” that can be manufactured on demand and works almost as well as the real thing, at least in monkeys …

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Nobel Prize: Announcement | Physiology or Medicine 2016

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has decided to award the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy. This year’s Nobel Laureate discovered and elucidated mechanisms underlying autophagy, a fundamental process for degrading and recycling cellular components. The word autophagy originates from the Greek words …

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TED: A new way to heal hearts without surgery | Franz Freudenthal

At the intersection of medical invention and indigenous culture, pediatric cardiologist Franz Freudenthal mends holes in the hearts of children across the world, using a device born from traditional Bolivian loom weaving. “The most complex problems in our time,” he says, “can be solved with simple techniques, if we are able to dream.”  

Cambridge University: Dementia: Catching the memory thief

It’s over a hundred years since the first case of Alzheimer’s disease was diagnosed. Since then we’ve learned a great deal about the protein ‘tangles’ and ‘plaques’ that cause the disease. How close are we to having effective treatments – and could we even prevent dementia from occurring in the first place? Researchers at the …

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Uppsala University: Antibiotic Resistance: The Silent Tsunami

Understand antibiotic resistance and what actions are needed to address this increasingly serious global health threat – watching this little animated video by Uppsala University. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change in some way that reduces or eliminates the effectiveness of drugs, chemicals, or other agents designed to cure or prevent infections. The bacteria survive …

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Flex Robotic System is a robot for minimally invasive surgery

The Flex Robotic System is developed by Howie Choset, a professor of Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute. It is designed for minimally invasive surgeries in the throat area, the system allows surgeons to navigate to the surgical site via robot and then perform surgery in a more traditional laparoscopic way.  

Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell: Genetic Engineering Will Change Everything Forever – CRISPR

Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly.  

Milken Institute: This Changes Everything: How Technology Is Revolutionizing Medicine

Moderator Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute Speakers Vadim Backman, Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Elizabeth Blackburn, Nobel Laureate; President, Salk Institute Juan Enriquez, Managing Director, Excel Venture Management Jack Gilbert, Professor of Surgery and Director, Microbiome Center, University of Chicago Nina Tandon, CEO and Co-Founder, EpiBone; Co-Author, “Super Cells: Building With …

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London Real: Ben Greenfield – Extreme Endurance

Ben Greenfield is an ex-bodybuilder, Ironman triathlete, Spartan racer, coach, speaker and author of the New York Times Bestseller “Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health and Life” In 2008, Ben was voted as NSCA’s Personal Trainer of the year and in 2013 was named as one of the top 100 Most Influential People In Health And …

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TEDx: Dr Brendan Egan: Muscle matters

Dr Brendan Egan is a University College Dublin (UCD) lecturer in sport and exercise science in the UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, whose TEDxUCD 2014 talk is entitled ‘Muscle Matters’.  

American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe Special Event | Zika: What You Need to Know

You’ve heard the warnings: Zika is coming. There are a slew of guidelines for pregnant women, but how should the rest of us prepare for the arrival of this virus? What can science tell us about the Aedes mosquito that spreads Zika? And what steps are being taken to halt mosquito-borne viruses? In this podcast, …

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Caltech: Gut Feelings: How Intestinal Bacteria Regulate Emotion and Behavior – S. Mazmanian

Caltech celebrated the launch of Break Through: The Caltech Campaign—an ambitious fundraising initiative that will help secure the Institute’s future. The celebration began with a symposium for the entire campus community: faculty, students, staff, alumni, family, and friends. A faculty member from each division explored briefly a seminal question and its potential to change the …

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TED-Ed: What is obesity? – Mia Nacamulli

Obesity is an escalating global epidemic. It substantially raises the probability of diseases like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and cancer. But what is the distinction between being overweight and being obese? And how does a person become obese? Mia Nacamulli explores obesity.

Formlabs: The Shirley Technique: A Cancer Survivor Receives a New Jaw

After Shirley Anderson lost his jaw to cancer, Dr. Travis Bellicchi took on the challenge of creating a prosthesis — with groundbreaking results. Both Shirley Anderson’s life and the medical field have been changed forever.

TED: How to read the genome and build a human being | Riccardo Sabatini

Secrets, disease and beauty are all written in the human genome, the complete set of genetic instructions needed to build a human being. Now, as scientist and entrepreneur Riccardo Sabatini shows us, we have the power to read this complex code, predicting things like height, eye color, age and even facial structure — all from …

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