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Category: Health: Medicine

TED: Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

  For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick — pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously — and transformed the lives of millions.    

MinuteEarth: Do We Have to Get Old and Die?

MinuteEarth asks and answers, Do We Have to Get Old and Die? We’d like to thank Focus Features for sponsoring this video – and for inviting us to pre-screen their summer 2015 film “Self/Less”. It’s a sci-fi flick that explores memory, consciousness, and immortality, and it made us think about the types of immortality that …

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Associated Press: Man Receives 1st Partial Skull, Scalp Transplant

Doctors at MD Anderson Cancer Center and Houston Methodist Hospital announced Thursday that they completed the world’s first partial skull and scalp transplant on May 22. Recipient Jim Boysen also received a new kidney and pancreas.  

General Electric: CRISPR-Cas9 the Key to Fighting Genetic Disease?

The CRISPR-Cas9 system has revolutionized genetic engineering. This groundbreaking discovery by scientists Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier has brought medical research light-years closer to finding a cure for many diseases, including sickle cell anemia, HIV, cancer, Huntington’s disease and more. To make efficient and reliable ways to make precise, targeted changes to the genome of …

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Vox: What Bill Gates is afraid of

What’s likeliest to kill more than 10 million human beings in the next 20 years? It’s probably not what you’d think.  

Rice University: New tactic targets brain tumors

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research at Rice University.  

Cambridge University: Killer T Cell: The Cancer Assassin

How does a Killer T Cell Kill its target? Our new film captures the behaviour of cytotoxic T cells – the body’s ‘serial killers’ – as they hunt down and eliminate cancer cells before moving on to their next target.  

University of California: Our Microbiome – Health Matters

Did you know that you have up to ten times as many microbial cells on your body as you have human cells? What are these tiny microbes doing and how did they find their way to you? Rob Knight, PhD joins our host David Granet, MD to discuss how these cells that make up our …

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MIT: Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas9

This animation depicts the CRISPR-Cas9 method for genome editing – a powerful new technology with many applications in biomedical research, including the potential to treat human genetic disease. Feng Zhang, a leader in the development of this technology, is a faculty member at MIT, an investigator at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and a …

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HBO: VICE | Killing Cancer Debrief

“My life, like most people’s, has been negatively affected by cancer, and the thought of my young children living in an age where this is no longer humanity’s No. 1 health fear was simply overpowering.” – Shane Smith  

Tal Danino: We can use bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it)

Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was “programmed” to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we’re just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something …

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TED: Rob Knight | How our microbes make us who we are

Rob Knight is a pioneer in studying human microbes, the community of tiny single-cell organisms living inside our bodies that have a huge — and largely unexplored — role in our health. “The three pounds of microbes that you carry around with you might be more important than every single gene you carry around in …

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UC Irvine: Why Unboil an Egg?

Gregory Weiss, UC Irvine chemistry professor, talks about “unboiling” egg white proteins and returning them to their original state. The ability to quickly restore molecular proteins could slash biotechnology costs and dramatically reduce the costs for cancer treatments. He also talks about a personal reason for his professional pursuits.  

TED Ed: How do vaccines work?

The first ever vaccine was created when Edward Jenner, an English physician and scientist, successfully injected small amounts of a cowpox virus into a young boy to protect him from the related (and deadly) smallpox virus. But how does this seemingly counterintuitive process work? Kelwalin Dhanasarnsombut details the science behind vaccines.  

AMNH: Countdown to Zero | Defeating Disease in the 21st Century

What does it take to defeat infectious diseases in the 21st century? The American Museum of Natural History and The Carter Center invite you to explore the innovative collaborative approaches being developed around the world to combat disease. Join former President Jimmy Carter, who is joined by Dr. Jane Carlton, director of the Center for …

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Mayo Clinic: Measles Virus as a Cancer Fighter

A medical first — a woman with an incurable form of cancer has had all signs of living cancer cells eradicated from her body for at least 6 months. What’s more, it was accomplished in a single treatment. And the magic potion — was the measles virus. For more information or to schedule an appointment, …

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Janko Nikolich-Zugich: The Biology of Aging: Why Our Bodies Grow Old

Dr. Janko Nikolich-Zugich presented the second lecture of the College of Science’s Living Beyond 100 lecture series on January 31, 2012. Dr. Nikolich-Zugich is, Professor and Department Head of Immunobiology; Co-Director, Arizona Center on Aging, at the University of Arizona. Abstract: All organisms age, but we really do not have a clear explanation how and …

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AMNH: SciCafe | Antibiotics and Obesity

Physician and microbiologist Martin Blaser discusses how changes in the human microbiome – through the overuse of antibiotics for example – may be contributing to an increase in chronic conditions including obesity, allergic disorders, and diabetes.  

Cambridge University: PARP-inhibitors | A New Generation of Cancer Drugs

First of new generation of cancer drugs granted European approval A new drug for ovarian cancer, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge and AstraZeneca, has become the first of new class of drugs, known as PARP-inhibitors, to be granted approval anywhere in the world. The drug, Lynparza, has been granted Marketing Authorisation from …

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Johns Hopkins: Johns Hopkins personal protective equipment prototype for Ebola

An advanced protective suit for health care workers who treat Ebola patients, devised by a Johns Hopkins team, is one of the first five awardees in a federal funding contest aimed at quickly devising new tools to combat the deadly disease. The Johns Hopkins prototype is designed to do a better job than current garments …

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