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Category: Health: Medicine

University of California: Engineering Immune Cells to Recognize and Kill Cancer

Immune cells are the body’s natural way of attacking infections and other invading pathogens. However, since cancer is not foreign (tumors are mutated versions of the body’s own cells), immune cells do not attack most cancer cells. Find out how scientists are using immune proteins to mobilize immune cells to fight cancer with Michael Fischbach, …

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Nature Video: Immunology wars | Monoclonal antibodies

Our immune systems are at war with cancer. This animation by Nature, reveals how monoclonal antibodies can act as valuable reinforcements to shore up our defenses – and help battle cancer.  

Nature Video: Immunology wars: A billion antibodies

Our bodies can create billions of antibodies to fight off billions of potential diseases. But how do our immune systems turn a limited number of genes into such an incredible diversity of antibody proteins?  

Harvard University: Unraveling the mysteries of aging

A research team led by David Sinclair at Harvard have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses aging, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars. The treatment with the NAD precursor NMN mitigates age-related DNA damage in mice and averts DNA damage from …

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Science Magazine: Promising malaria vaccine disables key parasite genes

Crippling just three of the malaria parasite’s 5000 genes could create a powerful, safe vaccine against a disease that sickens nearly 200 million people each year, according to a new study.  

Nature: Inside Alzheimer’s disease

Our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease has come along way in the last century. In this animation, Nature Neuroscience takes us inside the brain to explore the cells, molecules and mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this devastating condition – from the latest advances to the remaining gaps in our scientific knowledge.  

Nature video: Mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial diseases are a group of disorders caused by genetic mutations. In this animation, Nature Video finds out how these diseases arise, and how new techniques can stop them being passed on from mother to child.  

Discovery News: Is The Next Antibiotic Hiding Deep Within The Ocean?

What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform … everything. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov walks us through examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative …

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Nobel Prize: Announcement | Physiology or Medicine 2016

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has decided to award the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy. This year’s Nobel Laureate discovered and elucidated mechanisms underlying autophagy, a fundamental process for degrading and recycling cellular components. The word autophagy originates from the Greek words …

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Cambridge University: Dementia: Catching the memory thief

It’s over a hundred years since the first case of Alzheimer’s disease was diagnosed. Since then we’ve learned a great deal about the protein ‘tangles’ and ‘plaques’ that cause the disease. How close are we to having effective treatments – and could we even prevent dementia from occurring in the first place? Researchers at the …

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Uppsala University: Antibiotic Resistance: The Silent Tsunami

Understand antibiotic resistance and what actions are needed to address this increasingly serious global health threat – watching this little animated video by Uppsala University. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change in some way that reduces or eliminates the effectiveness of drugs, chemicals, or other agents designed to cure or prevent infections. The bacteria survive …

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American Museum of Natural History: SciCafe Special Event | Zika: What You Need to Know

You’ve heard the warnings: Zika is coming. There are a slew of guidelines for pregnant women, but how should the rest of us prepare for the arrival of this virus? What can science tell us about the Aedes mosquito that spreads Zika? And what steps are being taken to halt mosquito-borne viruses? In this podcast, …

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TED: A new superweapon in the fight against cancer | Paula Hammond

Cancer is a very clever, adaptable disease. To defeat it, says medical researcher and educator Paula Hammond, we need a new and powerful mode of attack. With her colleagues at MIT, Hammond engineered a nanoparticle one-hundredth the size of a human hair that can treat the most aggressive, drug-resistant cancers. Learn more about this molecular …

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TED: Good news in the fight against pancreatic cancer | Laura Indolfi

Anyone who has lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer knows the devastating speed with which it can affect an otherwise healthy person. TED Fellow and biomedical entrepreneur Laura Indolfi is developing a revolutionary way to treat this complex and lethal disease: a drug delivery device that acts as a cage at the site of …

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Cambridge University : How dogs can sniff out diabetes

A chemical found in our breath could provide a flag to warn of dangerously-low blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to new research the University of Cambridge. The finding, published today in the journal Diabetes Care, could explain why some dogs can be trained to spot the warning signs in patients. …

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Nature Video: The nerve bypass: how to move a paralysed hand

After a broken neck left him quadriplegic, Ian Burkhart was told he would never be able to use his hands. Now he can grasp a bottle and pick up a credit card by using a computer plugged directly into his brain. Special software is able to decode his thoughts and convert them into electrical signals …

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VOX: Our sterile homes might be giving us seasonal allergies

Seasonal allergies are the worst. Video by Gina Barton and Liz Scheltens Millions of Americans suffer from seasonal allergies. There isn’t a clear-cut answer as to why some people have them while others don’t but scientists do have one particular theory. The hygiene hypothesis is the idea that excessively sterile environments are contributing to the …

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Lund University: New ultrasound method creates a better picture of cardiovascular health

Researchers at Lund University have discovered a new and more accurate way to distinguish between harmful and harmless plaque in the blood vessels by using ultrasound. This can help healthcare providers determine the risk of strokes and heart attacks – which means avoiding unnecessary surgery for many patients.  

Slush: Fireside at Slush 2015 | Cancer Immunotherapy with Oncolytic Viruses

Fireside chat with Akseli Hemminki (TILT therapeutics) & Timo Ahopelto (Lifeline Ventures) at Slush 2015.  

Gresham College: Germs, Genes and Genesis: The History of Infectious Disease – Professor Steve Jones

We have an idea of where to place the cradle of civilization, but where is the cradle of disease? Where do infectious diseases come from? Some come from animals, but we gave some back (as cattle picked up TB from farmers). Leviticus discusses the problem of leprosy at some length and even develops an early …

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