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A New Era in Astronomy: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

Dr. Amber Straughn of NASA provides a behind-the-scenes look at the James Webb Space Telescope in this public lecture at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.  

Bill Wurtz: ‘History of the entire world, i guess’

This is a slightly bizarre, hilarious, but enlightening, history of the whole world. YouTube creator Bill Wurtz manages to capture the history of everything in some highly entertaining 20 minutes. Wurtz explains the entire history of the known universe, beginning at the big bang and ending in the near future.  

MIT: Secrets of the conch shell and its toughness

The shells of marine organisms are though, but one type of shell stands out above all the others in its toughness: the conch. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have explored the secrets behind these shells’ extraordinary impact resilience.  

Jupiter’s skies are peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms

Two research papers published in Science Magazine this week presents the latest data from Juno revealing a Jupiter peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms. Scientists have long known that Jupiter is a stormy place. But since NASA’s Juno probe reached the solar system’s largest planet last July, they’ve found it to be …

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NASA JPL: First Science From Juno at Jupiter

Scientists from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter discussed their first in-depth science results in a media teleconference on May 25, 2017. The teleconference participants were: Diane Brown, program executive at NASA Headquarters in Washington Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio Jack Connerney, deputy principal investigator at NASA’s Goddard Space …

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What Columbus Discovered – N. Wey-Gomez

The topic is “What Columbus Discovered” for this lecture by Nicolas Wey-Gomez, who is a professor of history at Caltech. Wey-Gomez explores some of the facts and fiction surrounding Columbus’s geographical surveys of the Bahamas and Caribbean Basin. He will show how the navigator’s discoveries revolutionized old ideas about the globe, and how science, faith, …

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Why whales grew to such monster sizes

A new study in Science Magazine explains the evolutionary forces behind the ocean’s behemoths. It offers an explanation of why some whales became the world’s biggest animals. “They found that the baleen whales’ growth spurt coincided with the beginning of the first ice ages. As glaciers expanded, spring and summer runoff poured nutrients into the …

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How Sherpas have evolved ‘superhuman’ energy efficiency

New research at Cambridge University reveals how the people living at high altitude in the Himalayas, sherpas included, have evolved to become superhuman mountain climbers, extremely efficient at producing the energy to power their bodies even when oxygen is scarce. The new research was published yesterday in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). …

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Engineering Human Genomes & Environments with Dr. George M. Church

This FORA.tv lecture by Dr. George M. Church is on two ever more relevant topics, genetic engineering of humans and what gene drive could imply for the environment and our future. CRISPR and its great potential is also accompanied with potentially catastrophic adverse effects. The CRISPR gene editing tools can be used to create a …

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DeepFrame – revolutionary Mixed Reality that looks like living holograms

The Danish company Realfiction has developed a screen called DeepFrame which gives us a mixed/augmented reality experience without using glasses. DeepFrame is a square-shaped 64-inch (115x115cm) transparent screen that is most similar to a window pane. Viewers can see what’s happening on the other side of the screen while displaying digital 3D objects in 4K …

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A brief history of goths – Dan Adams

The Goths were a Germanic people who were referred to as “barbarians” by the Romans, famous for sacking the city of Rome in A.D. 410, but who were they, really? And what do fans of atmospheric post-punk music have in common with the ancient barbarians? Not much … so why are both known as “goths”? …

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Veritasium: The Next Mission to Mars: Mars 2020

Veritasium visited NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) the leading U.S. center for robotic exploration of the solar system and has 19 spacecraft and 10 major instruments carrying out planetary, Earth science, and space-based astronomy missions. Some of the greatest moments in the history of space exploration have taken place at JPL. NASA’s forthcoming Mars project …

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University of California: Engineering Immune Cells to Recognize and Kill Cancer

Immune cells are the body’s natural way of attacking infections and other invading pathogens. However, since cancer is not foreign (tumors are mutated versions of the body’s own cells), immune cells do not attack most cancer cells. Find out how scientists are using immune proteins to mobilize immune cells to fight cancer with Michael Fischbach, …

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Adam Savage’s One Day Builds: Chewbacca and C-3PO!

Adam Savage is a world-class Star Wars nerd and a particularly big fan of Chewbacca. Here is another clip from Tested with Adam proving his building prowess and this time around, Adam improves his Star Wars props by revamping his Chewie costume to carry an animatronic C-3PO, as depicted in The Empire Strikes Back.  

The Creature and Special Effects of Alien: Covenant!

Tested and Adam Savage visits the massively built sets of Alien: Covenant. He chats with visual effects supervisor Neil Corbould about the resurgence of practical effects to complement CGI effects in blockbuster filmmaking. Adam also gets up close with some familiar Alien universe props in the creature fabrication workshop.  

Harvard University: More Ocean, Less Plastic | Anna Cummins

The problem of plastic pollution in the oceans is now a recognized threat to the health of our global marine ecosystems. We need new solutions to this ubiquitous plague. The project ‘5 Gyres’ has spent the last seven years surveying plastic pollution across the world’s subtropical gyres, oceanic systems that concentrate floating debris. The goal …

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Science Magazine: Tiny bubbles help heal broken bones

Repairing big bones breaks has been a challenge. Now researchers have used gene therapy to improve bone grafts in pigs. The new research “has huge clinical significance,” says David Kulber, who directs the Center for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, and who was not part of the study. …

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The First Trailer for Star Trek: Discovery Is Here

After a long wait, we finally have our first look at ‘Star Trek: Discovery’, CBS’ and Netflix’ new prequel series set a decade before the events of the original 1960s Star Trek. Sonequa Martin-Green, known from The Walking Dead, as Michael Burnham, a first officer promoted unexpectedly to the position of captain by her mentor, …

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How radio telescopes show us unseen galaxies | Natasha Hurley-Walker

Our universe is strange, wonderful and vast, says astronomer Natasha Hurley-Walker. A spaceship can’t carry you into its depths (yet) — but a radio telescope can. In this mesmerizing TED talk, Hurley-Walker shows how she probes the mysteries of the universe using special technology that reveals light spectrums we can’t see. Natasha Hurley-Walker helped with …

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Vox: The fight to rethink (and reinvent) nuclear power

New nuclear energy technology has come a long way – but can we get over our fears? This is the fifth episode of Climate Lab, a six-part series produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by Emmy-nominated conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives …

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Wired: What happens as we meld with ever more capable machines?

Earlier this year, scientists at the Imperial College London announced smart sensor technology that allows a robot arm to be controlled via signals from nerves in the spinal cord. We, humans, are interacting with robotics to an ever greater extent. Wired explores this robotic augmentation and asks what happens as we meld with ever more …

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Watch David Fincher Direct an Animatronic Bishop in Alien 3

Alien 3 celebrates its 25th anniversary this month, and to celebrate, the Oscar-winning effects house ‘studioADI’ present this gem from deep within the VHS vault. Footage from the prep and rehearsals of the Bishop puppet shoot complete with direction from David Fincher. Despite the aged quality of the video, it’s still an interesting watch demonstrating …

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The First Trailer for Seth MacFarlane’s Star Trek Spoof The Orville

Fox just released the first trailer for the ‘The Orville’ which stars MacFarlane and Adrianne Palicki as a divorced couple who are, similar to Kirk and Spock’s relationship, a little dysfunctional, on a brand new spaceship with a pleasantly crazy crew. The Orville will air later this year on Fox Here’s the synopsis: From Emmy …

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This Is What Will Happen in the Next Billion Years, According to RealLifeLore

Earth is billions of years old already. If we consider it possible that humanity or our descendants will survive for another billion years, then what could we reasonably expect to happen during that time frame?  

The MegaBot Mk.III Heavy Lift Arms and Leg Day

In the MegaBot web-tv series we get to follow MegaBots Inc. building an enormous robot, the Mark 3. The team is now testing the legs and arms of the Mk.II. When completed, it will have a total of 430 horsepowers, be five meters high (15 feet), weigh 5 metric tons (12,000lb) and – among other …

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